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Tsunami Messaging Project

Note: if you are just landing on this page for the first time, you will find the background explanation, linked here helpful in understanding what this project intends to do and is about.

Table 8: Tsunami Dangers: Part 3 - Currents, Marinas, Ports
Tsunami Messages
Message Source
Since tsunami wave activity is imperceptible in the open ocean, do not return to port if you are at sea and a tsunami warning has been issued for your area. Tsunamis can cause rapid changes in water level and unpredictable dangerous currents in harbors and ports. Tsunami -- The Great Waves (English -- 2012) IOC-ITIC-NOAA
Considerations if there is time to move a boat: Most large harbors and ports are under the control of a harbor authority and/or a vessel traffic system. These authorities direct operations during periods of increased readiness (should a tsunami be expected), including the forced movement of vessels if deemed necessary. Keep in contact with the authorities should a forced movement of vessels be directed. Tsunami -- The Great Waves (English -- 2012) IOC-ITIC-NOAA
If you are aware there is a tsunami warning and you have time to move your vessel to deep water, then you may want to do so in an orderly manner, in consideration of other vessels. Owners of small boats may find it safest to leave their boat at the pier and physically move to higher ground, particularly in the event of a locally generated tsunami. Concurrent severe weather conditions (rough seas outside of safe harbor) could present a greater hazardous situation to small boats, so physically moving yourself to higher ground may be the only option. Tsunami -- The Great Waves (English -- 2012) IOC-ITIC-NOAA
Damaging wave activity and unpredictable currents can affect harbors for a period of time following the initial tsunami impact on the coast. Contact the harbor authority before returning to port making sure to verify that conditions in the harbor are safe for navigation and berthing. Tsunami -- The Great Waves (English -- 2012) IOC-ITIC-NOAA
Since tsunami waves are imperceptible in the open ocean, do not return to port if you are at sea and a tsunami warning has been issued. Tsunami Safety for Boaters IOC-ITIC-NOAA
Tsunamis can cause rapid changes in water level and unpredictable dangerous currents that are magnified in ports and harbors. Boats and boaters are classified as a tsunami high risk group. Tsunami Safety for Boaters IOC-ITIC-NOAA
Boats are safer from tsunami damage while in the deep ocean of at least 200 fathoms deep (1,200 feet or 400 meters) rather than moored in a harbor. Port facilities could become damaged and hazardous with debris. Listen to mariner radio reports when it is safe to return to port. Tsunami Safety for Boaters IOC-ITIC-NOAA
Do not risk your life and attempt to motor your boat into deep water if it is too close to wave arrival time. Anticipate slowdowns caused by traffic gridlock and hundreds of other boaters heading out to sea. Small boat owners may find it safest to leave their boat at the pier and physically move to higher ground. Concurrent severe weather conditions may also make this the only option. Tsunami Safety for Boaters IOC-ITIC-NOAA
In a locally generated earthquake - tsunami scenario, there will be no time to deploy a boat as waves can come ashore within minutes. Tsunami Safety for Boaters IOC-ITIC-NOAA
In a distant generated earthquake - tsunami scenario, there will be more time (one or more hours) to deploy a boat. Listen for official tsunami wave arrival time estimates and plan accordingly. Tsunami Safety for Boaters IOC-ITIC-NOAA
Damaging wave activity and unpredictable currents can affect harbors for a long time following the initial tsunami impact on the coast. Contact the harbor authority or listen to mariner radio reports before returning to port. Make sure that conditions in the harbor are safe for navigation and berthing. Tsunami Safety for Boaters IOC-ITIC-NOAA
Mariners in deep water (600 feet or greater) should stay at sea. National Tsunami Warning Center
Those in shallow water or harbors should move to deep water if there is enough time and weather conditions are suitable. National Tsunami Warning Center
If natural warnings indicate that a tsunami could arrive within minutes: Leave your boat and go to high ground on foot as soon as possible. You don't have time to save your boat in this situation and could die if you try to do so. Tsunamis! What Boaters Should Know -- California EMA
If you are on the water but very near shore: If you can beach or dock your boat and get to high ground on foot within ten minutes of a Natural Warning, then this is your best chance. If that is not possible, head to deep water as quickly as possible. Tsunamis! What Boaters Should Know -- California EMA
If you are in deep water or very close to deep water: If you are already in 100 fathoms of water (600feet) then you are safe from tsunamis. If you are in deep water but not quite 100 fathoms, head to deeper water.
messagedangerscurrents.txt · Last modified: 2014/05/13 13:27 by rocky